And once again, from Roshi Doshi, something on the Magnificat (and the reality of suffering):

Magnificat (Luke 1:46-55)

[This post was inspired by a question from Pastor Nadia this morning]

“He hath filled the hungry with good things;
and the rich he hath sent empty away.”

We sang the Magnificat (Luke 1:46-55) last night as part of Holden Evening Vespers at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church. (more…)

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Roshi Doshi posted this on open windows & unlocked doors:

In Memory of Daido Roshi (1931-2009)

(more…)

Roshi Doshi has some nice photos of the outdoors in his blog these days.  Here’s his bit on the first snow where he lives:

It won’t last of course but fun to see the first real snow of the season! As far as I can tell we’ve got more than just about anyone so far.

Roshi posted this poem of his, which he read at a service for House of All Sinners and Saints:

one perfect day (mark 6:53-56)

i walk into intensive care

and see my sister lying under
crisp white sheets.
a dozen beeping monitors gathered
closely around her bed. (more…)

Roshi talks about why we pray and what we really expect when we pray.  He begins by saying:

The basement of St. Mark’s coffee house was filled with Holy Doubt tonight.

We were reading from Acts, 1 John and John.

But it was John 15:16 that set the Spirit free and the debate poured out and flooded the basement. Here’s the Scripture that set off the debate about prayer, whether it works and why we pray: “…the Father will give you whatever you ask him in my name.”

This promise of God granting our prayers occurs again and again in the Gospels.

But he also says:

One woman spoke of her mother dying of cancer. One man spoke of runaway children not returning. One spoke of fear that doesn’t go away. And I could not help but think of my Mother’s suicide. All spoke of prayer and prayers not answered.

If you want to see the whole thing, click here.

Roshi Doshi blogs about his visit to St. Gregory of Nyssa in San Francisco.  You may remember his blog piece I linked to on take this bread earlier:

10 march 2009

St. Gregory of Nyssa

St. Gregory of Nyssa church in San Francisco is located directly across from the Anchor Steam Brewery in San Francisco. Nadia had suggested that I attend morning prayer at St. Gregory’s since I was in town on business anyway … and as I trudged up the street at 745 AM and spied the simple wood building that is St. Gregory’s I almost turned back to the Starbucks and the New York Times that are my more typical morning prayer service. You see, another participant in the prayer service was going to be Sara Miles, author of Take This Bread, about whom I have posted. Sara’s book was a big part of my “decision” to jump into the unknown of being a Christian. Meeting a hero is a bit unnerving.

I walked in between the two wide open wooden doors to a huge sanctuary with incense hovering in the air like a ghost, illuminated by the rising sun from across the bay. Sara instantly saw me, called out “Richard!”(bear in mind we’d never met) and gave me a huge hug. It was quite something. So, I was glad I passed up Starbucks for St. Gregory.

If you want to see the whole thing, you can link here.

Roshi posted again on his blog about how he became a Christian (again).  He gives credit to Sara Miles and her book “take this bread.”  He says, “Sara showed me a faith, a Christ and a church that i had never seen before.  one that said you are OK, you are loved and you don’t have to be afraid.  the Table is big, and all (and she really means ALL ) are welcome.”  If you are interested in his post, click here.  If you are interested in Sara’s book, you can order it here.