This is The Lead on Episcopal Cafe today.  If you watch the video on the link, I’d be interested in your responses:

DOMA, Proposition 8 and the Easter story

John Fugelsang draws a contemporary parallel to the story of the Passion and Resurrection in this commentary. Does its analogy hold up for you?

Having shared Jim Richardson’s thoughtful comments when this first broke, I thought this follow up in the Sacramento Bee was worth sharing.

This from the Associated Press Via the Episcopal Cafe Lead (it was posted by Jim Naughton):

The Associated Press tells this horrific story via the Boston Herald:

THIES, Senegal — Even death cannot stop the violence against gays in this corner of the world any more.Madieye Diallo’s body had been in the ground for only a few hours when the mob descended on the weedy cemetery with shovels. They yanked out the corpse, spit on its torso, dragged it away and dumped it in front of the home of his elderly parents.

The scene of May 2, 2009 was filmed on a cell phone and the video sold at the market. It passed from phone to phone, sowing panic among gay men who say they now feel like hunted animals.

 There are people who will tell you with a straight face a) that it is culturally imperialistic to attempt to change the kinds of attitudes that inform this violence and b) that no member church in the Anglican Communion has any business ordaining LGBT priests and bishops until such attitudes change.

James Richardson wrote a thoughtful piece on this in his blog.  You can find the article here.  I think it’s worth reading.

That’s “The Lead” at Episcopal Cafe.  This happened on a 95 to 21 vote (with 74 needed to approve).  If I understand correctly, this means that all churches that want to can perform civil or religious ceremonies for same-sex couples.  No church has to do this.  And it means that some individual congregations (including congregations from the Church of England) can perform such marriages, without the Church of England ever having approved them.  This is because the head of the Church of England is the Queen, and some decisions about what the church can or cannot do (like approving a new Prayer Book) are effectively decided in Parliament.  It’s really very interesting how this works.  And it changes the landscape on this question in England.

I read an article from the New York Times, seemingly from a religious conservative, this past week.  And the tone was along the lines that if we could just stop fixating on sexuality, maybe conservatives and liberals in the church (in the broadest sense) could focus on real Christian ministry.  Jeremiah talked about the real sin of Sodom being their unwillingness to share what they had with those in need.  And conservatives have begun to focus, perhaps, less on their personal faith, and more on living up to the gospel.  They have been challenged from within to start doing a better job of responding to the desperate needs of the world around them in God’s name. (more…)

The proposed Ugandan laws opposing homosesuality (and support of homosexual persons) has also been addressed by our Presiding Bishop.  The report in Episcopal Life Online begins:

[Episcopal News Service] Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori said Dec. 4 that the church believes “the public scapegoating of any category of persons, in any context, is anathema” and thus is “deeply concerned” about a proposed Ugandan law that would introduce the death penalty for people who violate that country’s anti-homosexuality laws.Jefferts Schori also noted in her statement that “much of the current climate of fear, rejection, and antagonism toward gay and lesbian persons in African nations has been stirred by members and former members of our own church.”

“We note further that attempts to export the culture wars of North America to another context represent the very worst of colonial behavior,” she said. “We deeply lament this reality, and repent of any way in which we have participated in this sin.”

You can see the whole article here.