This is The Lead on Episcopal Cafe today.  If you watch the video on the link, I’d be interested in your responses:

DOMA, Proposition 8 and the Easter story

John Fugelsang draws a contemporary parallel to the story of the Passion and Resurrection in this commentary. Does its analogy hold up for you?

This from the Associated Press Via the Episcopal Cafe Lead (it was posted by Jim Naughton):

The Associated Press tells this horrific story via the Boston Herald:

THIES, Senegal — Even death cannot stop the violence against gays in this corner of the world any more.Madieye Diallo’s body had been in the ground for only a few hours when the mob descended on the weedy cemetery with shovels. They yanked out the corpse, spit on its torso, dragged it away and dumped it in front of the home of his elderly parents.

The scene of May 2, 2009 was filmed on a cell phone and the video sold at the market. It passed from phone to phone, sowing panic among gay men who say they now feel like hunted animals.

 There are people who will tell you with a straight face a) that it is culturally imperialistic to attempt to change the kinds of attitudes that inform this violence and b) that no member church in the Anglican Communion has any business ordaining LGBT priests and bishops until such attitudes change.

From the Daily Episcopalian on Episcopal Cafe (with thanks to Monica Romano for the tip):

By Marshall Scott

I’ve been thinking about another of my frequent conversations at the bedside. It begins with, “How are you doing?” And while it might wander a bit, frequently it comes back to this: “I’m having a hard time with this, Chaplain; but they say that God won’t give you more than you can handle.” My initial response to this is, “Perhaps; but I often find myself wishing God didn’t have quite so much faith in me!” (more…)

That’s “The Lead” at Episcopal Cafe.  This happened on a 95 to 21 vote (with 74 needed to approve).  If I understand correctly, this means that all churches that want to can perform civil or religious ceremonies for same-sex couples.  No church has to do this.  And it means that some individual congregations (including congregations from the Church of England) can perform such marriages, without the Church of England ever having approved them.  This is because the head of the Church of England is the Queen, and some decisions about what the church can or cannot do (like approving a new Prayer Book) are effectively decided in Parliament.  It’s really very interesting how this works.  And it changes the landscape on this question in England.

Episcopal Cafe has an update on the move towards woman bishop’s in the UK.  The artile begins:

While the movement towards women bishops is stalled in England because the revision committee missed their deadline, The Scottish Episcopal Church moves towards the election of a new Bishop of Glasgow & Galloway for which one of the three finalists is a woman.

If you want the full update, you can find it here.

On Episcopal Cafe, there is an interesting article on “rethinking the religious box score.”  It talks about how in baseball the on base percentage may be more important than the hits and RBIs listed in the box score (and a pitchers ratio of ground balls to fly balls may be more important than ERA).  In applying it to the Roman Catholic Church, John Allen says (in the National Catholic Reporter) that

If you want a measure of how over-emphasis on a limited set of categories distorts perceptions, consider this: Barrels of ink have been spilled dissecting the Vatican’s outreach to disgruntled Anglicans, which, realistically, might bring a few thousand new members into the church worldwide. Here you have an effort to integrate 1.3 million folks more thoroughly into the church, and it flies below radar — because, of course, ministry to the deaf doesn’t open a new front in the culture wars, which is a category we in the West take very seriously indeed.

To which the folks at Episcopal Cafe add

So the question to we Episcopalians is this: what things do we value and how does this distort or enhance our picture of the church, the world, and the people we are called to minister to? What would “Sabermetrics” for the Episcopal Church look like?

If you want to see the whole article, you can find it here.

This comes from Episcopal Cafe.  It’s a follow up on my earlier posting on the same legislation:

A special session of the Executive Council of the Episcopal Church has been called to discuss the church's position on the “Anti-Homosexuality Bill” currently before the Ugandan Parliament. The meeting will be conducted via conference call on the afternoon of December 7, according to numerous sources.

Special sessions of Executive Council can be called by the Presiding Bishop or, as in this instance, by a petition signed by at least nine members of the council. (more…)