World Events


And this from Episcopal Cafe’s Lead:

On this the Thursday of Easter Week, we commend to you the Easter Message of the Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti, Jean Zaché Duracin:

‘The Lord is with all Haitians,’ Bishop Duracin says in Easter message
Msgr. Jean Zaché Duracin, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti’s EASTER MESSAGE 2010

 “Alleluia, He is risen”

Brothers and Sisters in Christ, (more…)

After all the misinformation, that seems to get more air time than the truth, it was good to see this in the AARP Bulletin:

This is not a government takeover of the nation’s health care system. Virtually all of the 160 million Americans with employer-sponsored coverage will be able to keep it.  The 15 million now self-insured and 32 million uninsured will also have the option of private coverage. (more…)

James Richardson wrote a thoughtful piece on this in his blog.  You can find the article here.  I think it’s worth reading.

That’s “The Lead” at Episcopal Cafe.  This happened on a 95 to 21 vote (with 74 needed to approve).  If I understand correctly, this means that all churches that want to can perform civil or religious ceremonies for same-sex couples.  No church has to do this.  And it means that some individual congregations (including congregations from the Church of England) can perform such marriages, without the Church of England ever having approved them.  This is because the head of the Church of England is the Queen, and some decisions about what the church can or cannot do (like approving a new Prayer Book) are effectively decided in Parliament.  It’s really very interesting how this works.  And it changes the landscape on this question in England.

My colleague Craig Kuehn is blogging about the increase of medical bankruptcies.  He says:

• 62.1 percent of all bankruptcies have a medical cause.

• Most medical debtors had health insurance, were well-educated and were middle-class.

• Insolvency attributable to medical problems rose by 50 percent between 2001 and 2007.

Anyone who is a citizen of this country should be ashamed of these numbers. The richest country in the world is failing its people. And in spite of this and other evidence that health care in this country is broke, Congress dithers. Medical costs continue to skyrocket with no end in sight. This will force more and more people into bankruptcy

If this piques your interest, you can read more here.

Episcopal Relief and Development has a brief article on the earthquake in Chile.  And if you wanted to donate to their disaster relief fund for this, you can donate here.  To donate to help in Chile, donate under “disaster relief” (which is the second option).  The first option is still to donate for relief in the aftermath of the earthquake in Haiti.  Both are worthy causes.  I particularly like donating through ERD (and Heiffer International) because they are on the ground, with local people, for the long haul.  But by all means donate through your favorite charity.  What’s important is to meet the need.

I read an article from the New York Times, seemingly from a religious conservative, this past week.  And the tone was along the lines that if we could just stop fixating on sexuality, maybe conservatives and liberals in the church (in the broadest sense) could focus on real Christian ministry.  Jeremiah talked about the real sin of Sodom being their unwillingness to share what they had with those in need.  And conservatives have begun to focus, perhaps, less on their personal faith, and more on living up to the gospel.  They have been challenged from within to start doing a better job of responding to the desperate needs of the world around them in God’s name. (more…)

This came to me from our Deacon, Bob Olsen, who received it from the Rev. Eric Duff, the Executive Director of Episcopal Community Services in this diocese, to whom it was sent:

Dear Sisters and brothers in Christ,

 Please let me take some time to give you some update of the situation of Haiti and your beloved partners in the Episcopal church of Haiti. God has saved the lives of the bishop, the 32 active priests, 9 retired priests, the 6 deacons, the 17 seminarians, 3 nuns and the 4 missionaries and their families. All private houses have been damaged to some degree, but all churches, schools, rectories clinics, and hospitals from Croix des Bouquets to Miragoane are not permitted to be used. In Port au Prince and Leogane, all structures of the Episcopal Church have been completely destroyed. We cannot evaluate how many parishioners and staff members we lost. In the south, BTI is ok but the Saint Sauveur rectory is not safe to sleep in. The seminarians went back to their home town; one of them is a physician, and he has stayed at college St Pierre in Port au Prince to give first aid to the people. The Episcopal church of Haiti has set up more than 7 centers to support victims, mostly in the worst hit areas where the bishop is based with whatever supplies they have been able to receive. (more…)

Mary Layman from St. James in Lincoln wrote the following (to Deacon Cindy Long).  They have a relationship with a school in Haiti (and a number of people in the diocese — as Brother Adam noted, the largest in the Episcopal Church).  Here’s her update on what they know from their sources:

Thank you for you prayers and support.  We are all heart sick especially by the silence.

 We have very little news since the forwarded email from Pere Ajax sent on Wednesday.   The Bishop and his wife are well.   She suffered some injuries as their home collapsed.   We have not heard a word from Fr. Walin and I pray he was in Hinche at the time.    Our project/school is near Hinche in the high plateau and was not hit by the earthquake. (more…)

Got the following from Brother Adam’s blog (why reinvent the wheel?):

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