World Events


James Richardson brought this piece (op ed in the New York Times) to my attention.  Can you understand why something was done and still feel total outrage that it was done.  I think that’s how I’m feeling.  Here it is:

NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF Published: May 26, 2010
Fred R. Conrad/The New York TimesTimes

We finally have a case where the Roman Catholic Church hierarchy is responding forcefully and speedily to allegations of wrongdoing.  But the target isn’t a pedophile priest. Rather, it’s a nun who helped save a woman’s life. Doctors describe her as saintly. (more…)

Yes, I realize that (my energy has been low and) I have not been posting of late.  But this, from Midlife Bat Mitzvah is just too good not to mention:  Gospel Shabbat!  It was a special service of the Shabbat set to gospel music composed by Stephen Saxton.  Here are a couple of excerpts:

Rabbi Steven Chester – our senior rabbi, with whom I’m doing my Bat Mitzvah studies – added a political context during the closing benediction when he spoke about Arizona’s controversial new legislation allowing police to stop anyone they suspect of being an illegal immigrant.

and

But I’m straying afield. Back to the Gospel Shabbat – it was moving, uplifting and inspiring. I’d love for our temple to host  it again, maybe several times a year. And I could easily see this receiving an enthusiastic welcome at both synagogues and churches across the country. One of Saxon’s aims with the service, in fact, was to deepen interfaith understanding and connections between Christian churches and Jewish congregations.

It makes a lot of sense since a lot of gospel music is about the Exodus in Egypt and the journey to the Promised Land.  Anyway, if you want the whole article, you can find it here.

This from the Associated Press Via the Episcopal Cafe Lead (it was posted by Jim Naughton):

The Associated Press tells this horrific story via the Boston Herald:

THIES, Senegal — Even death cannot stop the violence against gays in this corner of the world any more.Madieye Diallo’s body had been in the ground for only a few hours when the mob descended on the weedy cemetery with shovels. They yanked out the corpse, spit on its torso, dragged it away and dumped it in front of the home of his elderly parents.

The scene of May 2, 2009 was filmed on a cell phone and the video sold at the market. It passed from phone to phone, sowing panic among gay men who say they now feel like hunted animals.

 There are people who will tell you with a straight face a) that it is culturally imperialistic to attempt to change the kinds of attitudes that inform this violence and b) that no member church in the Anglican Communion has any business ordaining LGBT priests and bishops until such attitudes change.

And this from Episcopal Cafe’s Lead:

On this the Thursday of Easter Week, we commend to you the Easter Message of the Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti, Jean Zaché Duracin:

‘The Lord is with all Haitians,’ Bishop Duracin says in Easter message
Msgr. Jean Zaché Duracin, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti’s EASTER MESSAGE 2010

 “Alleluia, He is risen”

Brothers and Sisters in Christ, (more…)

After all the misinformation, that seems to get more air time than the truth, it was good to see this in the AARP Bulletin:

This is not a government takeover of the nation’s health care system. Virtually all of the 160 million Americans with employer-sponsored coverage will be able to keep it.  The 15 million now self-insured and 32 million uninsured will also have the option of private coverage. (more…)

James Richardson wrote a thoughtful piece on this in his blog.  You can find the article here.  I think it’s worth reading.

That’s “The Lead” at Episcopal Cafe.  This happened on a 95 to 21 vote (with 74 needed to approve).  If I understand correctly, this means that all churches that want to can perform civil or religious ceremonies for same-sex couples.  No church has to do this.  And it means that some individual congregations (including congregations from the Church of England) can perform such marriages, without the Church of England ever having approved them.  This is because the head of the Church of England is the Queen, and some decisions about what the church can or cannot do (like approving a new Prayer Book) are effectively decided in Parliament.  It’s really very interesting how this works.  And it changes the landscape on this question in England.

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