Thursday, April 8th, 2010


Well, after reading Brother Adam’s piece on simplicity (and ashes, and how he had chosen to look at the ashes of his own losses, rather than the rebirth that was happening out of the ashes), I’m hesitant to write (yet again) about my gastric bypass experiences.  And I need to acknowledge up front that, on balance, this remains a resurrection experience for me.  I continue to lose weight at a brisk pace (almost 50 pounds since February 8), I continue to reduce my medications (though not officially with the last reduction) and new life possibilities are opening up (not all of them having to do with my health).  So the bottom line is still good news here.  I went out with a friend Monday (I’m on vacation this week) and took a lot of photographs in the Sausalito area.  Life is, mostly, good.

But I’ve been blogging about this mainly so that others who are considering such a surgery (there are other surgical options) or someone going through this can get a sense of what this has been like (is like) for me — and (remembering that every experience is completely individual), just possibly what it might be like for them.  And probably the biggest learning is that it is an ongoing process (and likely to remain so for a long time).  I keep wanting to be completely “healed.”  But it doesn’t look like it’s going to work out that way in any near future.  I’m going to have to live with this and adapt to this for some time to come.  Maybe a year or two from what I can gather.  And even then I expect life to be very different from life pre surgery. (more…)

And this poem, on the Last Supper, From Open Windows and Unlocked Doors:

it will be a long night
with this feast
of fish, olives, wine and bread;
their sweet aromas are mingling with
the smoke of the flickering candles. (more…)

At Christ Church, Bingham, New York (as found on Fiat Lux):

The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts Schori
Presiding Bishop and Primate
The Episcopal Church

What are you most afraid of? What wakes you up in the middle of the night? For some here tonight it’s probably about where the next paycheck will come from. I have one friend who’s just been diagnosed with ovarian cancer, and another whose son is in jail for statutory rape. For almost all of us, there is some primordial fear linked to thoughts about our freedom and our own mortality. (more…)

And this from Episcopal Cafe’s Lead:

On this the Thursday of Easter Week, we commend to you the Easter Message of the Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti, Jean Zaché Duracin:

‘The Lord is with all Haitians,’ Bishop Duracin says in Easter message
Msgr. Jean Zaché Duracin, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Haiti’s EASTER MESSAGE 2010

 “Alleluia, He is risen”

Brothers and Sisters in Christ, (more…)

One of the things I love about being a Christian is I can go deeper down the rabbit hole.  I keep having new aha’s, often fueled by the fact that I have to do lots of reading and thinking to prepare for the next sermon.  I had a new insight into the resurrection when I was preparing for my Easter sermon.

Here’s an overview of my evolving understanding of the meaning of the Resurrection. (more…)

It’s not new, but Brother Adam posted for a 4th time on Simplicity.  He comments early in his article like this:

One further preliminary thought about ascetic practices leading to better focus. I was wondering why I was reluctant to write more, apart from general busy-ness, and yesterday it came to me. Focus on what? Focus for what? Whose focus?

If the focus is mine, or on something that comes from me, then what I will achieve in that kind of focus is to narrow my attention down to something that is going to be of my choosing, and will reflect me. But that is precisely what I do not want, as a monk, as a person striving for simplicity so that God may be more present to me and I more present to God. An ascetic discipline which increases intensity of focus on my life, my hopes, my desires, my past experiences, my whatevers, is going to narrow me and draw me deeper into myself, into a place which may not in the end be productive.

If you are interested in the whole article, you can find it here.