Wednesday, May 20th, 2009


Here’s an interesting excerpt from an Easter sermon on inclusion given by “the sarcastic Lutheran.”

As many of you know, last week Seth and I attended the Rocky Mountain Synod assembly – the legislative body for this region of the Lutheran church.  For more than 10 years my denomination has been talking about human sexuality.  Much like the early church who were convinced that gentiles could only become Christians if they changed into being Jews first (which, for the record, involved a rather unpleasant process), (more…)

Roshi talks about why we pray and what we really expect when we pray.  He begins by saying:

The basement of St. Mark’s coffee house was filled with Holy Doubt tonight.

We were reading from Acts, 1 John and John.

But it was John 15:16 that set the Spirit free and the debate poured out and flooded the basement. Here’s the Scripture that set off the debate about prayer, whether it works and why we pray: “…the Father will give you whatever you ask him in my name.”

This promise of God granting our prayers occurs again and again in the Gospels.

But he also says:

One woman spoke of her mother dying of cancer. One man spoke of runaway children not returning. One spoke of fear that doesn’t go away. And I could not help but think of my Mother’s suicide. All spoke of prayer and prayers not answered.

If you want to see the whole thing, click here.

Bishop Dan did a quick writeup on the most recent draft.  (This is a proposed document for defining the relationship between all member churchs of the Anglican Communion, including the Episcopal Church.)  I’d link you, but it’s all here:

I still haven’t digested the document. But it all seems to turn on section 4, the enforcement clause. And apparently the ACC has not approved that except as a discussion document. So the thing really isn’t even on the table yet for voting by anyone. It is more like a motion made so the subject can be discussed. We should therefore discuss — but as in the case of germ fears, don’t panic.

I have mixed reactions to yesterdays election results.

On the one hand, the whole budget process is a mess.  I think the system is broken.  And I don’t think the propositions that failed yesterday would have fixed things.  I also understand that people are angry (and why they are angry).  I’m angry too.

On the other hand, I think we just put a lot more people out of work (and lost a lot more services).  A lot of that was going to happen anyway.  But more of that will happen now.

My wife is a teacher, so she could be inpacted.  People at church work for the state, so they may be impacted.  And the extra job losses will impact everyone (and likely delay our economic recovery).

That’s my take, anyway.  It might be worth it if the system was fixed.  I see no signs that will happen.  Instead, I see fewer jobs and fewer services.  And the likelyhood that we will tend to write off the needs of those who are marginalized.  Biblically, I’d say that’s a challenge for all of us.